Create Picaxe 14M2 Project Board on a breadboard!

hippy

Technical Support
Staff member
I still don't have a way to extend the legs on my stereo output programming socket so I tried to use hot glue and add a wire to the end of it but that didn't go very well?
Wrapping wires around the socket's leg and gluing might work but won't be reliable. It will be much better to solder sturdy wires to the socket. Or solder flying wires to the socket and take them to the breadboard.

Or solder the socket to an off-cut of vero-board or stripboard and add 0.1" header pins to that.

Or just buy the AXE029 Breadboard Adapter designed for the task -

http://www.picaxe.com/Hardware/Cables/Breadboard-Cable-Adapter
 

lbenson

Senior Member
What is an axe module?
I still don't have a way to extend the legs on my stereo output programming socket so I tried to use hot glue and add a wire to the end of it but that didn't go very well?
Not likely to go well. If you don't have the picaxe 14 project board, you might do well to get one--guaranteed programming for 08M2, 14M2, and 20M2 picaxe chips, and you can swap a programmed chip into your breadboard. For even more convenience, run wires from SERIN, SEROUT, and 0V to your breadboard, and you can program the chip on the breadboard.
picaxe 14 project board.jpg
And get a cheap soldering iron. Others may advise differently, but I find 15 watts entirely adequate--for hundreds of solder points a year at 2-3 seconds per point.
 

lbenson

Senior Member
Either of these soldering irons from RS Components should be fine. And get 60/40 solder in a fine diameter (lead-free is too hard for hobby use).
RS Soldering Irons.jpg
 

lbenson

Senior Member
Saying that it is "exactly as above" isn't as good as a photograph, especially if glued-on leads make up a part of the actual arrangement.

With your voltmeter set as a continuity/resistance tester, do you have continuity for 0V and SEROUT, and 22K for SERIN, and 10K for SERIN to 0V?
 

lbenson

Senior Member
I just need to get a soldering iron . . . Is this good?
Should be fine. More wattage than I feel is needed, so don't linger on the solder point after the solder flows well.

Looks like there may be a screw barely visible where the tip goes into the shaft, so may well take good replacement tips.
 

westaust55

Moderator
Hello Electronics Learner 123 (and others),

If once you have dropped the default IC onto your bread/proto/strip board you right click then you have the opportunity to select many specific IC's such as the PICAXE range and quite a number of other ICs often used with PIACXE projects.
It can pay to review the list of alternative parts.
Where there is a specific IC in the list the image on the screen will include far more information than a plain IC outline that can be useful for checking wires really are connected where intended.

PEBBLE ICs.png
 

hippy

Technical Support
Staff member
I also have the Picaxe breadboard adapter- where should I place this on the breadboard?
This doesn't exactly say where but the wiring you want to achieve is this -
Code:
         AXE029
   .----------------.                   -| 10      5 |-
  _|_.----.      oo |- N/C              -| 11      4 |-
 |   |    |   o  oo |- RXD ----.        -| 12      3 |-
 |_ _|    |  |o| oo |- TXD <---|--- SO --| 13      2 |-- SI <--.
   | `----'  |o| oo |- 0V  ----|--- 0V --| 14  _   1 |-- +V    |
   `----------------'          |         `----' `----'         |
              |                |                               |
       Fit link towards        `-------------------------------'
          this side
On breadboard things can be simplified; you can put the adapter adjacent to the PICAXE then just jump leg 12 to leg 2 -
Code:
         AXE029
   .----------------.                   -| 10      5 |-
  _|_.----.      oo |- N/C              -| 11      4 |-
 |   |    |   o  oo |- RXD ----.--- B1 ->| 12      3 |-
 |_ _|    |  |o| oo |- TXD <---|--- SO --| 13      2 |-- SI <--.
   | `----'  |o| oo |- 0V  ----|--- 0V --| 14  _   1 |-- +V    |
   `----------------'          |         `----' `----'         |
              |                |                               |
       Fit link towards        `-------------------------------'
          this side
Having RXD connect to the B.1 pin should be electrically safe even if that pin is set as an output. If an output that will require a DISCONNECT command and Hard Reset to download.
 
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datasmith

Active member
OK, the AXE029 has the two resistors that were included on the upper right corner of the Picaxe on your breadboard, so I removed them.
The jumper on the AXE029 just determines which pin that TX comes into the module on. I set it to the LEFT to use Pin 1. Then the module gets wired directly to ground and to the Picaxe's Serial In and Serial Out. I also moved the capacitor around a bit to makes the common ground connection a little cleaner. I have attached a new script for you.
 

Attachments

Electronics Learner 123

Well-known member
I have attached an image of the breadboard adapter, is it okay that the solder points near the stereo output ( the groups of 2) are connected slightly?
The header pins are the other way round( the two lots of four) I got this from a reference image but when I looked at the pebble diagram this wasn’t the case (can I just put it upside down?)
 
Last edited:

lbenson

Senior Member
I have attached an image of the breadboard adapter, is it okay that the solder points near the stereo output ( the groups of 2) are connected slightly?
No image attached. It's unclear which pins you mean, and exactly what you mean by "connected slightly". If "connected slightly" means an intermittant connection, that's no good if a connection was intended. If it's connected to a pin which is inconsequential (are you sure?), then by definition it's of no consequence.

Please provide photo of exactly what you mean, with arrows drawn if it isn't clear.
 
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