PICAXE Net Server Available!

Technical

Technical Support
Staff member
#1
We are pleased to announce the PICAXE Net Server (PNS) is now available!

Further information is here
<A href='http://www.rev-ed.co.uk/docs/flier_picnet.pdf' Target=_Blank>External Web Link</a>

Manual is here
<A href='http://www.rev-ed.co.uk/docs/net001.pdf' Target=_Blank>External Web Link</a>

Please also ensure you upgrade to the latest version of the PICAXE Programming Editor software (4.1.16)
 

ylp88

Senior Member
#2
<i>yipeeeeeee! </i>

Any idea when it will make it down to Australia? Microzed doesn't have it on their site yet but then again... I'm just anxious if I expect them to get it so soon! More interested to find out the price in AU$ so that I can...

...plan.

<b><i>ylp88 </b> </i>
 
#4
Hey Technical,
Wouldn't you actually have one of these PICAXE.Net Servers hanging off a port on your 256 port corporate router? That be a nice sales pitch! You know, something we could actually look at? Would be nice to have a look at some of your web pages on a fully functioning PNS. Possibly the wind spend and direction at PICAXE HQ! Maybe there is a link on the PICAXE web site? If so.... I haven&#8217;t found it yet.

Cheers,
The HamRadioAddict
 
#5
Hey Technical,
Wouldn't you actually have one of these PICAXE.Net Servers hanging off a port on your 256 port corporate router? That be a nice sales pitch! You know, something we could actually look at? Would be nice to have a look at some of your web pages on a fully functioning PNS. Possibly the wind spend and direction at PICAXE HQ! Maybe there is a link on the PICAXE web site? If so.... I haven&#8217;t found it yet.

Cheers,
The HamRadioAddict
 
#9
Hey...cool stuff, I'm in.

BUT, my quick reading of the documentation suggests that dynamic IP addressing won't do.

What is the likelihood of an ISP (in my case, BT) allocating me a static IP address? It's my understanding that whilst they *can* do this, they are usually unwilling to because it's a hassle for them.
 

Technical

Technical Support
Staff member
#10
Ideal (read simplest) situation is a fixed IP, and most ISPs will do it if you pester hard enough (or pay enough!).

However you can also use a dynamic DNS system such as that provided by www.no-ip.com or www.dyndns.com (amongst others).

We are preparing a datasheet that explains how to do this. In summary you:

1) register with one of the DDNS companies. They will give you a fixed web address (such as myPNS.no-ip.com) that eventually become the address to your PNS
2) connect your PNS via a router that supports hardware DDNS updates (our test bed unit here is the Linksys WRT54GL cable router - most newish routers support DDNS)
3) configure the router to actually send hardware DDNS updates (default is normally disabled)
4) configue the router to support a mixture of fixed and dynamic IP addresses on the local NAT network (e.g. dynamic DHCP only on 192.168.0.1 - 192.168.0.99)
5) give your PNS a fixed IP address that doesn't clash with the dynamics (e.g. 192.168.0.150)
6) configure the router to use port forwarding (ports 80 and 21) to the PNS on this fixed IP

This may also sound complicated (and it does take a while to configure) but at the end of the day you get a fixed web address to enter into your browser that will always find the PNS, even when the IP address dynamically changes!


Edited by - Technical on 30/04/2006 22:55:27
 
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