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Eng460

Member
Hard to tell just where this thread is leading, if indeed anywhere. It seems to have long gaps between responses.

But just in case anyone is reading at some future time, I would like to correct the power equation quoted above.

Power equals volts times amps (P=V x I, P in Watts, V in volts, I in amps, no matter if you use V or E for voltage)

Volts = I x R (Ohms law, R in ohms)

so Power = V x I = I x R x I or V = I x I x R or I squared times R.

Apologies to all who know this already. I would just hate some future explorer to be mislead!

Hope the Murray trip is still happening.

Eng460

Perhaps the above was the trick ” fact” included to see if anyone was reading. Well, I fell for it!
 
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premelec

Senior Member
@boriz... look up "superconductor" so far they are pretty darn cool :oops: At living temperatures a silver bar is as close as you are going to get...
 

techElder

Well-known member
no matter if you use V or E for voltage
In my days in education, there was a subtle difference between "V - voltage" and "E - electromotive force", but I'll be danged if I can remember what the difference is after all these years in industry. :D
 

120ThingsIn20Years

Senior Member
Hard to tell just where this thread is leading, if indeed anywhere. It seems to have long gaps between responses.

But just in case anyone is reading at some future time, I would like to correct the power equation quoted above.

Power equals volts times amps (P=V x I, P in Watts, V in volts, I in amps, no matter if you use V or E for voltage)

Volts = I x R (Ohms law, R in ohms)

so Power = V x I = I x R x I or V = I x I x R or I squared times R.

Apologies to all who know this already. I would just hate some future explorer to be mislead!

Hope the Murray trip is still happening.

Eng460

Perhaps the above was the trick ” fact” included to see if anyone was reading. Well, I fell for it!

I've been battling disease.

But as people are taking offence at this thread, I'll not post to it any more.

I was just thanking a few people who I missed when I was going back over my education these last few days (and I did slip up and ask a question a while back).

I'm trying to get back up to speed.

I found this thread fun to read the second time around, but I'd lock it if it would stop making people unhappy.

So thanks to everyone who had any part of my original introduction into electronics, and particularly to anyone who's thanks were deserving, but who I missed thanking.

I wont reply to any posts on this thread so that I might stop offending/irritating people, and the thread will die.

It's been fun.

-Craig
 

Eng460

Member
Hi Craig, I hope that you did not interpret anything I said as my being offended. I am another who would say keep posting. I did notice the long gaps and wondered what was going on.

Sorry to hear that you have been ill. I hope you will soon be back to your projects. In the meantime, there is lots of good reading on this forum. And I hope that your electronics education is still ongoing.

Eng460
 

Eng460

Member
Hi Tech Elder, Like you, I am sure that somewhere in the distant past I was taught about a difference, and like you, I have long since forgotten it.

My observation, which is not necessarily a complete authoritative answer, is that EMF is more commonly used for the back EMF encountered when you connect a voltage to an inductor, perhaps in a transformer or an electric motor, while voltage seems to be normally, but not universally used for power supplies and forward voltages or voltage drops throughout a circuit. I had reason to look it up recently and I believe it might have been Wikipedia, again based on that shaky memory, that said the use of EMF is historical, but it does not matter which you use so long as it is clearly understood that EMF is not a force Like the force exerted on your hands when you try and lift something heavy.

So while it is not authoritatively proven by my reading, I did conclude that it really doesn’t matter which is used. I am certainly open to other points of view.

Eng460
 

westaust55

Moderator
Voltage is represented by a capital ‘V’
Electromotive force ostensible by capital ‘E’

from ISO 1000 covering the Systeme Internationale,
1 units are lowercase unless named after named a person (Messers Volta, Ampere, Newton, Hertz, Tesla, etc)
2. There should always be a space between the numeric value and the units.
There as always there are exceptions to the rules
Resistance/ohms uses the Greek omega as its symbol.
We have kVA but kvar.
 

geezer88

Senior Member
My last reply was rather snarky. I got to wondering what the real topic was. If I understand it correctly, it boils down to what is volts vs emf? My personal understanding is that volts is the unit of measure, and emf is the driving force behind electron movement. But that is my simple mind's way of simplifying things for my simple mind.

Here's a discussion with more points of view than a body can stand to read:


As Bill and Ted would say, "Party on, Dude"

tom
 
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