Development Board AXE091 full Schematic

Hi,

I have been looking around for a complete schematic for this great bit of kit, but other than the "bits & pieces" of schematics in the documentation, I have not been able to find one.

I am guessing, but I cannot believe that the PCB was designed without a full schematic being made first.....so would it be too much to ask to have it made available as a download? (Assuming that I have not simply missed it on my searches! Apologies if I have!!)

Other boards have to my mind better and full information, the
28-PIN PROJECT BOARD for example has a full schematic, which I use each and every time I use that PCB.

Furthermore, I am going to modify the AXE091 slightly to allow me to socket the resonator, which means I can change it when I wish, as I once did with the
28 Pin Project Board, which works just fine.

This mod is important (I feel) if you own a mixture of chips as I do, different ages, speeds and types and you need higher performance from a newer chip than the AXE091 otherwise allows.....

I just used some turned pin sockets, supplied in strips, that just happen to be the same widths apart as the holes for the resonator in the PCB. They are optically identical with the other sockets on the AXE091 PCB.

Its a simple and effective and very easy change to make. The resonators are sold here on ebay, in pairs for very little money, so you can buy a suitable range for almost any PICAXE chip needed.....

Two methods. 1) Solder sucker, will allow resonator to be removed undamaged and re-used when required. 2) NO solder sucker, cut resonator up and remove each leg singly to reduce the possibility of damage to the PCB.

A little experience with all aspects of soldering is recommended....ask a friend who has the necessary knowledge and experience as well as the tools is better than damaging the unit....

Thanks in advance.

Andy

PS. I just looked at the small schematics again, they do not properly identify the connections on the board either, so for a failure free usage, you need to check everything out with an Ohmmeter and write it down, to make sure you connect correctly.

All in all, the PCB needs to be documented far better....
 
Last edited:

hippy

Technical Support
Staff member
I do not know what development process was followed to produce the AXE091 but I am not aware of any schematics beyond what is included in the AXE091 datasheet.

I am not sure which connections you have found which do not appear to be identified properly but we will be pleased to clarify where necessary.
 
Hi Hippy,
I compared it with the documentation for the 28 Pin PCB and they appear not to have been made by the same process/person. I can of course use an Ohm Meter each time to check what I want to use, or I could try and retroactively make such a schematic. But I thought that to design the PCB, the whole schematic must have been submitted, it couldnot have been built by any of the PCB design software that I have seen. Or it was laid out mostly by hand.....no idea.....
Thanks for replying, I do think it would help users myself, but I may be the only one thinking that way.....
maybe some other's could post, either way of course!
Regards
Andy
 

hippy

Technical Support
Staff member
I compared it with the documentation for the 28 Pin PCB and they appear not to have been made by the same process/person. I can of course use an Ohm Meter each time to check what I want to use, or I could try and retroactively make such a schematic.
If you can let us know what you are struggling with we can hopefully help you out.

I suspect the query relates to the header pins around the 28 and 40 pin sockets. The inner socket is for 28-pin chips, the next row out ( and inside the white silk screen ) is the 40-pin socket. The next out are for wiring jumpers to the 28-pin, the outer most for wiring to the 40-pin. It's not a straight one-to-one connection from 28-pin leg to 40-pin leg on the left hand side once you go below leg 7.
 
Pin/part identification connections AXE091

If you can let us know what you are struggling with we can hopefully help you out.

I suspect the query relates to the header pins around the 28 and 40 pin sockets. The inner socket is for 28-pin chips, the next row out ( and inside the white silk screen ) is the 40-pin socket. The next out are for wiring jumpers to the 28-pin, the outer most for wiring to the 40-pin. It's not a straight one-to-one connection from 28-pin leg to 40-pin leg on the left hand side once you go below leg 7.
Actually the wiring for the PICAXE chip sockets is fairly logical. The less obvious connects to the PC keyboard socket, the three push switches, the IR LED, the other LEDs - which pin is which!
It is not a big deal, but a proper schematic/connection diagram would speed up working.....the one for the 28 pin experimental PCB is brilliant, it shows a schematic "on" an outline of the PCB and its components. Absolutely brilliant.
Maybe schematic is the wrong word, but you can see where the connections are made between components. That makes life easy!!
Many thanks for your time and trouble.
regards
Andy
 

hippy

Technical Support
Staff member
The less obvious connects to the PC keyboard socket, the three push switches, the IR LED, the other LEDs - which pin is which!
I am a bit lost as to how you mean. The connector row on the right (near the LED's) has a silk-screened label to the right of each socket hole. There is a list in the same order with each pin function described in the datasheet.
 
Some parts are already mated with say ground and or a resistor, this connection list and mini schematics gives little information as to polarity or connection so to be 100% certain (the situation of being less than 100% certain is simply not a good situation! We all make wrong guesses from time to time, just look at the forum pages), the connections must be identified with the use of an Ohm meter for example.
A pin number with the name might have helped, but I still feel that a full schematic, on a PCB shape, as with other such PCBs, would have been quite useful....but thats just me....
But if you feel that is par for the course (though other PCBs from Rev-Ed appear to be to me better documented) then forget it, I will document it enough for my usage. Its still a useful piece of kit for anyone wanting to use PICAXE chips.....I am happy to have it.
I also see no need to argue about its present qualities.
Thanks for your interest.
 

Circuit

Senior Member
The AXE091 is both a development board for prototyping and a board for education; learning how to wire up and use PICAXE chips. For both purposes, especially the latter, I rather agree that a full schematic would be immensely helpful. I can see the educational reason for keeping things simple by just providing the individual schematics for each element of the board, but a full schematic would be a really helpful thing to have to give a quick reference overview when prototyping and for the student to see how all the elements are integrated together.
 
AXE091 Schematic

The AXE091 is both a development board for prototyping and a board for education; learning how to wire up and use PICAXE chips. For both purposes, especially the latter, I rather agree that a full schematic would be immensely helpful. I can see the educational reason for keeping things simple by just providing the individual schematics for each element of the board, but a full schematic would be a really helpful thing to have to give a quick reference overview when prototyping and for the student to see how all the elements are integrated together.
YES!!

You put it far better than I do!! Thanks. Having both available would allow personal choice in the matter.

Though if no copy of the whole schematic exists anymore (at the PCB manufacturer maybe a copy still survives?), I don't see anyone working it out anymore or better said, having not the time/interest....sadly.

I do feel that for any future PCBs offered by Rev-Ed, they should consider to make available an outline and connection diagram of the PCB. I think that the pdf infos supplied for the 28 pin board AXE020 Starter Pack for example, is a classic of simplicity and usefulness that should be kept to as far as possible.

Look here for example:-

http://www.picaxe.com/docs/axe020.pdf

This is taken from the Resources on the page:-

http://www.picaxe.com/Hardware/Starter-Packs/PICAXE-28-Starter-Pack/

....are truly complete, but simple and easy for anyone to understand (even me:rolleyes:)

Thanks to all concerned whatever the final outcome.

Andy
 

westaust55

Moderator
The attached two sheet may prove useful. A third sheet on following post.

Does not include the 40 pin PICAXE socket.

Does show some extra series resistors that i added to my AXE091 for the 7-segment display (to save space on the smaller breadboard area)
 

Attachments

The attached two sheet may prove useful. A third sheet on following post.

Does not include the 40 pin PICAXE socket.

Does show some extra series resistors that i added to my AXE091 for the 7-segment display (to save space on the smaller breadboard area)
Really great, I thank you most kindly for sharing what to me are really important schematics.

Th extra resistors are a really good idea, the method to install them too!! Simple but effective!

I am sure that I am not the only one very happy to have them! Hopefully a few others will post their thoughts....

I see they are 1 of 3 and 2 of 3, but do you have a chance to get hold of 3 of 3? But if not, it won't be a problem, so don't make a fuss about it, 2 out of the original 3 is fantastic on its own and I do not want to appear to be in an way ungrateful for your excellent help!!

regards

Andy
 

Hemi345

Senior Member
Andy, you probably missed his 2nd post of attachments that has 3 of 3 (post #11)

Thanks WA55 for posting these :)
 

Antonovitch

New Member
My thanks to to WA55 for posting the AXE091 schematics... I'm new to Picaxe but it seemed really odd not to provide this basic info, in an educational product where navigating through unfamiliar material should be part of the skillset. I'm finding my way around the board - but oddly there's no LDR installed, though in the PDF documentation for the board there is definitely one pictured. Change of specs? Hopefully picaxe support will clarify...
 

Technical

Technical Support
Staff member
Due to EU RoHS regulations which apply to 'finished products' like the AXE091 the LDR is no longer pre-fitted.

However as these regulations do not apply to loose individual components (or kits of components) you will find a loose LDR in the bubble bag packaging that you can solder on yourself....
 

john2051

New Member
Hi Westaust55,
A really nice pair of diagrams that have really been a big help in the past. Do you have any plans to incorporate
the 40pin picaxe, although technically not necessary, but handy for reference.
Thanks john
 

techElder

Well-known member
Great schematics, but have a couple of corrections to add.

V+ and GND are actually connected on the 28/40 socket at "legs" 20 and 8 & 19, respectively.
 

john2051

New Member
Thanks westaust55, I appreciate that, but the others were so helpful, I just had to ask.
Perhaps Tech supplies could include a complete diagram.
Technical, this rohs problem you mention, is that due to the cadmium in the ldr or something else?
 

TedTuranski

New member
Thank you for the full schematic for the AXE091. I appreciated the download and the printout of the schematic.
I started learning microcontrollers with PICAXE-08M over a decade ago, but just recently ordered my AXE091 Development Board a couple of weeks ago from England and the package came in just a few days. Been working on several projects on my AXE091 and really enjoying it. I'm also new to this forum. My name is Ted Turanski. Location is Lake City, Michigan, USA
 
Top