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    Line/magnet follower

    Hi, A "point to point" steering algorithm is going to be more difficult to devise, particularly if the magnet spacing is changing, and when some steering "turn" is already being applied. Also, I think your sensors are much too far apart. You say you get 55 ....x..... 55 whether there is a...
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    Line/magnet follower

    Hi, If these are the readily available Neodimium button magnets (typically 4+mm in diameter and 1+mm thick, then they are usually magnetised across their thickness, so one face is "North" and the other "South". They will try very hard to stack themselves automatically to form a stronger "rod"...
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    Line/magnet follower

    Hi, Multiplication by 0 is simply "throwing away" the data. But actually you only need two sensors, one to the left and the other to the right of the "line". Then "compare" the strength of the two channels to tell which is nearer to the line and steer accordingly. This might be done...
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    MAX7219 and spiout 16bit

    Hi, The manual seems quite specific that only the values 1 to 8 are "intended", but (as you found), there can be advantages in not actually rejecting other values as an "error". However, supporting a full word would complicate the compiler / interpreter code considerably, even if the low byte...
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    MAX7219 and spiout 16bit

    Hi, According to the command reference the number of bits shifted out may be only 1 to 8 (not 16). Cheers, Alan. PS: Please put your Program Code in [ code] [ /code] tags. ;)
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    Sound detector to detect hammer strikes

    Hi, IMHO the first thing you need to decide is if you are going to detect a "dc" or "ac" signal. The accelerometer was basically "dc" whilst audio is fundamentally "ac". The accelerometer may have been bipolar (bidirectional), i.e. accelerating and then decelerating but over a relatively long...
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    Serial LCD question

    Hi, The schematic that I found for the FRM010 doesn't show a pullup resistor on any of the "jumper" pins, so maybe the output is "floating" (low). Try connecting a 10k (say) pullup resistor (to the supply rail), or you could just try a PULLUP 128 command in the program (to activate the...
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    Raspberry pi camera and Picaxe

    Hi, Do you mean use the PICaxe instead of the Pi, or in addition ? What do you want it to do (that the Pi can't) ? The PICaxe might be able to control the power / LEDs and maybe Pan and Tilt the camera (with servos or steppers). But in terms of "handling" the image signal (let alone...
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    Using rotary encoder with interrupt

    Hi, Firstly, you haven't said if you're using an M2 or X2 chip, which have rather different interrupt features. Particularly with M2s, a problem is that the only source of interrupts can be an input pin (so additional output pins may be needed to "manage" the interrupt source). Also, the...
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    cardashboard

    Hi, Hmm, Philips ICs have been "branded" NXP for many years now, but it will probably work fine. ;) Yes, those LCD modules are very well-known but not all quite the same. There are various code versions on the forum, but this quite recent "Finished Project" looks like it might be a good...
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    FVR and battery voltage

    Hi, Thanks hippy. It proves I'm not yet a Power User of PE6 . ;) @Julian: Ah yes, as in the title of the original Code Snippet, I think that code is probably suitable only for M2 chips. However, if you need only 2 decimal digits of voltage resolution then post #2 in my other code snippet...
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    cardashboard

    Hi, Firstly, have you checked the Contrast potentiometer/voltage on the LCD display? However, if it is one of the LCDs with an "I2C Backpack", then they are not easy to drive. They require 4-bit data with "clock/enable" signals elsewhere in the transmitted bytes. But it has been done with a...
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    FVR and battery voltage

    Hi Julian, I don't want to hijack this thread, but I've been refreshing my memory of this code snippet which might be the one you used. Fortunately, the program doesn't use any SFR commands (which are implemented differently in X2s), but the ADCCONFIG command uses different flag positions...
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    FVR and battery voltage

    Hi Julian,, Probably not. I don't use X2s myself, but a few members who tried have reported problems (@BESQUEUT in particular). Although it looks as if the SFR commands should work, it appears that the internal PICaxe Interpreter (Operating System) does something to block or cancel the FVR...
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    cardashboard

    Hi, Those are obviously "7-bit" addresses, but PICaxe uses 8-bit addressing (with the LSB always 0). So try address $4E or $7E. Ah yes, the 6502 was a real "Programmers" micro. But as an "Engineer", I preferred the Z80. ;) Cheers, Alan.
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    FVR and battery voltage

    Hi, Sorry, rather late to the party, I've been asleep for a few hours. :) You don't need a resistor divider, or even a pin, to read the PICaxe's supply rail (i.e. the battery voltage in this case), just use the CALIBADC command. There are various examples in the "Code Snippets" section of...
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    adc stability for volt meter

    NO, you need to halve the potential divider, e.g. change 1k -> 2k or 15k -> 6.8k . Cheers, Alan
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    cardashboard

    Hi, Sorry, I didn't read your question carefully enough. You can use (hardware) I2C on c.1 and c.2 and read an ADC signal on c.4. Then the DAC can be used as an ADC input by using the ReadDAC command: The DAC has a high source resistance; set it to DACLEVEL 16 and the input/output...
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    cardashboard

    Hi Hans, Welcome to the forum and a Happy New Year. You can use a PWM output (with a small external low-pass RC filter) for a DAC output. Much lower output impedance and higher resolution (10 bits versus 5 bits) than the internal DAC. There's only one "official" PWM output on the 08M2 (c.2)...
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    adc stability for volt meter

    Hi, Try a battc = 0 before the For loop. ;) But IMHO it's not the ultimate solution and I still suspect a hardware (layout ?) problem. There's a very old computing motto: "Garbage in, Garbage out". Cheers, Alan.
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